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Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

3 edition of Patterns of livestock ownership and distribution in Zimbabwe"s communal areas found in the catalog.

Patterns of livestock ownership and distribution in Zimbabwe"s communal areas

Garry Christensen

Patterns of livestock ownership and distribution in Zimbabwe"s communal areas

by Garry Christensen

  • 105 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Extension, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Zimbabwe in Mount Pleasant, Harare, Zimbabwe .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Zimbabwe
    • Subjects:
    • Animal industry -- Zimbabwe -- Statistics.,
    • Livestock -- Zimbabwe -- Statistics.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Garry Christensen and Christopher Zindi.
      SeriesWorking paper ;, AEE 4/91, Working paper (University of Zimbabwe. Dept. of Agricultural Economics & Extension) ;, AEE 91/4.
      ContributionsZindi, Christopher.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD2131 .A46 no. 91/4
      The Physical Object
      Pagination22 p. :
      Number of Pages22
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1075032M
      LC Control Number93980265

      Devolution and stewardship in Zimbabwe's CAMPFIRE programme Devolution and stewardship in Zimbabwe's CAMPFIRE programme Murombedzi, James C. Abstract: Zimbabwe's CAMPFIRE programme is widely regarded as one of Africa's most successful contemporary conservation initiatives. It permits the residents of communal lands à basically poor, black people à to share in the   Special emphasis was put on smallholder and communal farmers in terms of household food security, incomes and the production of high value crops. In other words, using a participatory approach, the study investigated whether or not the liberalisation of agricultural markets has improved productivity in the smallholder and communal farming

      Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Trade Statistics. Unemployment Rate. Latest Publication. Zimbabwe Smallholder Agricultural Productivity Report Poverty Report new. Poverty, Income, Consumption and Expenditure Survey Report. Education Report Migration in Zimbabwe Country Profile Supply and Use Tables for Zimbabwe In particular, this approach combines three steps: First, average annual erosion rates of cropland erosion for smallholder areas are estimated using the Soil Loss Estimator for Southern Africa (SLEMSA). The average rate of erosion for Zimbabwe's cropland in the communal areas is estimated to be around 40 t/ha annually, a comparably high soil ://

      INTRODUCTION. The policy discourse on farm labour in southern Africa, and in Zimbabwe in particular, has not caught up with the times. Framed as it is by a focus on full‐time wage labour and employment rights,1 Soon after land reform, attention focused on farmworker displacement and human rights questions (FCTZ, ; HRW,). More recently, the General Agricultural and Plantation Workers Union A longitudinal study was conducted in low-input low-output farming systems to determine the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasitic infections in different age groups, sex and associated risk factors in goats. A total of indigenous goats were randomly


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Patterns of livestock ownership and distribution in Zimbabwe"s communal areas by Garry Christensen Download PDF EPUB FB2

Patterns Of Livestock Ownership And Distribution In Zimbabwe's Communal Areas. By Gary Christensen. Abstract. Communal farmers are the major owners of livestock in Zimbabwe. In they owned 68% of all cattle, 99% of all goats, 84% of all sheep, and 60% of all pigs.

Patterns Of Livestock Ownership And Distribution In Zimbabwe's Communal Areas. By Gary Christensen and Christopher Zindi. Abstract. AEE Working al farmers are the major owners of livestock in Zimbabwe.

In they owned 68% of all cattle, 99% of all goats, 84% of all sheep, and 60% of all pigs. Moreover, this dominance of national Patterns of investment in livestock in the communal areas are discussed in relation to the valuations made.

Returns to land in communal area livestock systems are found to be considerably higher than in conventional beef ranching systems, as long as the full value of livestock   Communal Lands, in so-called communal farming systems.

Although commercial offtake from Zimbabwe’s communal cattle herd is low, communal farmers are productive and rational in their cattle herd management. The economic rationale for cattle ownership   Communal Lands AEE/9/91 Mehretu, A.

Patterns of Land Use Pressure in Communal Areas of Zimbabwe. AEE/10/91 Mehretu, A and G. Mudimu. Patterns in Land Utilisation Cognitive Behaviour on Resource Stewardship in Communal Areas of Zimbabwe: Toward A Comprehensive Design for Land Use Analysis and Policy.

AEE/1/92 Von Blanckenburg, :// Communal livestock farming is one of the world's oldest farming systems and is predominately practised by rural households in developing countries, especially in ://   The role of donkeys in integrated crop-livestock systems in semi-arid areas of Zimbabwe Note: This version of the paper has been specially prepared for the ATNESA website.

It may not be identical to the paper appearing in the resource book This paper is published in: Starkey P and Fielding D (eds), Donkeys, people and ://   Colonialism and Inequity in Zimbabwe Abstract The battle over access to land resources in Zimbabwe demonstrates how gross inequities with respect to distribution of and access to key life supporting resources such as land and forests can compromise human and environmental security, and undermine conservation efforts.

Matabeleland North, a large   A summary of Zimbabwe’s land tenure systems are given in Figure 1, while Table shows the distribution of the country’s agricultural land by farming sector and natural region (NR).

Overall, only 19% of Zimbabwe’s farmland is in NRs I and II and almost 63% of this high potential land is in the large scale commercial   The growing discourses around excluding „strangers" and of resettling near own communal areas reflects growing ethno-regionalism in Zimbabwe’s land policy.

To illustrate: people believe that the manner in which some indigenous people’s farms were listed for acquisition was parochial, for instance in some Mashonaland   Zimbabwe’s 24 livelihood zones show that most livelihood activities in the country are primarily centred on rain-fed agriculture (crop production, livestock and fisheries).

They are highly susceptible to climate-related hazards and shocks, thereby, making rural household vulnerable to shifts and changes in the climate (Figure 1). Communal livestock production systems are dynamic being responsive to changes in the socio-political and economic environments.

A survey was conducted in Simbe communal area of Gokwe South   land ownership patterns and land administrative mechanism that occur in such transitional zones are key factors that define the dynamics of development in urban and peri-urban areas.

Studies world-wide have shown that small farms almost always produce far more agricultural output per unit area than large Zimbabwe’s FT LRP, despite its shortcomings, altered existing social relations of ownership, access, and utilization of land by reallocating land to people from diverse areas and backgrounds.

The FT LRP also reflects the government’s unwillingness to clarify land ownership in the new resettlement   Zimbabwe’s land reform has had a bad press.

Images of chaos, destruction and violence have dominated the coverage. Indeed, these have been part of the reality - but there have also been successes, which have thus far gone largely unrecorded. The story is not simply one of collapse and catastrophe.

It is much more nuanced and 's Land Reform Booklet • residentisal site in urban areas ( – 1 m) 2 Private land by titlehold • smallholding (agricultural holding) (1ha – 25 ha) • large land holdings (farms) • held by government • parks • used only by State land • irrigation schemes 3 models of government or those • forestry ownership   THE EFFICACY OF SMALLHOLDER TOBACCO FARMERS ON RURAL DEVELOPMENT IN ZIMBABWE By Leonard Chitongo A dissertation submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for a Philosophiae Doctor in Geography in the Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences at the University of the Free State Qwaqwa Campus June Supervisor: Prof.

?sequence=1&is. • Alienated land- land in private ownership, mostly in the form of farms and ranches. • Communal land- State owned land, conforming closely to the original ‘native reserves’ of the early s, in which live the majority of Zimbabwe’s rural communities, and • Forest areas-state owned land set Based Natural Resource Management.

Wildlife was transformed from a burden to an asset for landowners and there was a rapid shift from livestock to game ranching across large areas of southern Africa. For example, there are c. 91 and km 2 of game ranches in Namibia (extrapolated from Krug, ) and South Africa [ National Agricultural Marketing Council (NAMC),   communal areas of Zimbabwe describing the dimensions of livestock production in Zimbabwe’s communal areas: e.g.

importance, production systems, gender, ownership constraints etc. LinKS Interest Provides baseline data on livestock ownership, gender and some of the important constraints to livestock production in communal.

The economic rationale for cattle ownership is firstly to provide draught power and manure for tillage and secondly to provide milk and meat for local consumption, although the role of livestock in the farming system varies significantly from one part of Zimbabwe to ://  Large predators largely remained within protected areas and we found no evidence to suggest any were permanently resident in communal lands.

In the protected areas lions occurred at population densities of between and / km 2 (Loveridge et al., ), leopards at / km 2 in the northeastern part of HNP (unpublished camera trap data) and hyaenas at / km 2 In East Africa, an estimated 70% of wildlife populations are dispersed outside protected areas on community land.

The way of life of the pastoralists, essentially support the thriving of wildlife. However, pastoralism is slowly transiting to more sedentary forms of livestock production. The region‘s wildlife populations future now largely depends on the conservation of habitats and migratory